SLCC General Catalog 2013-2014

Geographic Information Science Technology (GIS) AAS

CTE Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
65 credits minimum

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Program Description

The Geographic Information Science Technology program provides students with skills in Geographic Information Science Technology, using ESRI software. GIS related employment is one of the fastest growing areas in today’s work place. A Geographic Information System (GIS) is a powerful tool designed to work with data referenced by spatial or geographic coordinates. This system captures, stores, checks, integrates, manipulates, analyzes and displays data. The data is spatially referenced to the earth. Geographic Information Sciences use GIS tools along with remote sensing, aerial photography, photogrammetry, and others to capture, store, retrieve, analyze, model and display data.

The unique application of GIS appeals to students’ interest in numerous academic/economic sections including but not limited to the following, Marketing, Urban Planning, Public Safety, Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement, Medicine, Forestry, Bureau of Land Management, Transportation, Environmental Studies, Emergency Preparedness, Archeology, and Public Utilities. These entities are only a small sample of the ubiquitous nature of GIS.

Career Opportunities

Students completing the GIS Certificate will be highly qualified for most entry-level geospatial technology positions, specifically in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Entry-level positions could include: local, state, and federal governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, transportation, public utilities, private sector positions, and military.

The strength of the GIS Certificate is its broad interdisciplinary applications. Students seeking an Associate of Science (AS) or Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree will find greater marketability when combined with the GIS Certificate. Students combining degrees with the GIS Certificate can find potential jobs in: geography, environmental geology, surveying, wildlife/ecology, sustainability, energy management, business and marketing, criminal justice, computer science, transportation, urban planning, computer information systems, education, social sciences, communication, government, homeland security, disaster response, non-profit organizations, the private sector, and more.

Estimated Cost for Students

Tuition & Books each semester

Estimated Time to Completion

If students follow the suggested sample schedule, completion time is four semesters.

General Education Requirements

Core Skills:

Composition (EN) 3 Credits

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

ENGL 1010

Intro to Writing

3

A

WRTG 0990 w/C grade or better or appropriate Accuplacer score

Quantitative Studies (QS) 3 Credits

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

MATH 1030

Quantitative Reasoning

3

A

RDG 0900; Within the past year, MATH 1010 w/C grade or better, or appropriate Accuplacer score

Communication (CM) 3 Credits

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

COMM 1010

Elem of Eff Comm

3

A

 

OR

 

 

 

 

COMM 1020

Prin Public Speaking

3

A

 

Human Relations (HR) 2-3 Credits

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

LE 1220

Human Relation

3

A

 

Distribution Areas: (6 Credits)

Choose one course (three credits) from two of the following distribution areas.

Course

Credits

 

Biological Science (BS)

3-4

 

 

Fine Arts (FA)

3-4

 

 

Humanities (HU)

3

 

 

Interdisciplinary (ID)

3

 

 

Physical Science (PS)

3

 

 

Social Science (SS)

3

 

 

NOTE: CHEM 1010 and/or PHYS 1010 are recommended as Physical Science (PS) Distribution courses.

 

Required Courses: (37 Credits)

Course

 

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

GEOG 1000

Earth’s Surface Env

3

A

 

GEO 1060

Envr Geology

3

Sp

Coreq: GEO 1065

GEO 1065

Envr Geology Lab

1

Sp

Coreq: GEO 1060

GEOG 1300

Regional Geography

3

F, Sp

 

GEOG 1400

Human Geography

3

F, Sp

 

GEOG 1700

Natural Disasters

3

F

 

GEOG 1800

Geospatial Tech

3

A

 

GEOG 1820

Applied GIS

3

A

GEOG 1800 or instructor approval

GEOG 2100

Maps/Measurement

3

F

 

GEOG 2200

Urban/Envr Issues

3

Sp

 

GEOG 2920

Applied GIS II

3

Sp

GEOG 1820 or instructor approval

MATH 1040

Intro to Statistics

3

A

RDG 0990; within last year MATH 1010 w/C grade or better or appropriate Accuplacer score

MET 1010

Intro Meteorology

3

A

 

 

Elective Courses: (Select 10 Credits From The Following)

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

*CHEM 1010

Intro to Chem

3

A

**

*GEO 2350

Fld Studies Geol

3

Su

Instructor approval

GEO 1220

Historical Geol

3

Sp

GEO 1110. Coreq: GEO 1225

GEO 1225

Histl Geol Lab

1

Sp

Coreq: GEO 1220

GEOG 2000

Geography Co-op

2-4

A

Instructor approval

*GEOG 2900

Indep Projects

1-3

A

Instructor approval

MATH 1050

College Algebra

4

A

RDG 0990; within last year MATH 1010 w/C grade or better or approporiate Accuplacer score

*MATH 1060

Trigonometry

3

A

RDG 0990; within last year Math 1050 w/ C grade or better

PHYS 1010

Elem Physics

3

A

**

SVT 1110

Surveying Math

4

F

Math 1010 or CPT

SVT 1030

Surveying

3

Sp

SVT 1110 or Math 1060

*Recommended

**Students who choose to fulfill the Physical Science (PS) distribution area with courses other than these should still consider these courses as highly recommended for elective credit

 

Sample Schedule

1st Year Schedule

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

ENGL 1010

3

CM

3

MATH 1030

3

GEOG 1820

3

GEOG 1000

3

GEOG 1300

3

GEOG 1400

3

GEO 1060/1065

4

GEOG 1800

3

GIS ELEC

4

Total

15

Total

17

2nd Year Schedule

 

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Distribution

3

GEOG 2200

3

GEOG 2100

3

GEOG 2920

3

MET 1010

3

GIS ELEC

3

GIS ELEC

3

LE 1220

3

GEOG 1700

3

Distribution

3

 

 

MATH 1040

3

Total

15

Total

18

 

Advising Notes

Students who need to take preparatory classes to meet the requirements of first semester courses should plan on extra time to complete a degree. ACT or CPT placement exams are designed to assist in determining which preparatory classes may be appropriate for each student. 

The semester in which courses are taught are listed above. Students should check the semester class schedule for day/evening availability and modifications caused by varying enrollment. It is the student’s responsibility to examine each course description for details of prerequisite classes.

 Program Student Learning Outcomes

Related College-Wide Student Learning Outcomes

 

  1. Acquire substantive knowledge
  2. Communicate effectively
  3. Develop quantitative literacies
  4. Think critically and creatively
  5. Develop knowledge and skills to be civically engaged
  6. Develop the knowledge and skills to work with others in a professional and constructive manner
  7. Develop computer and information literacy
  8. Develop the attitudes and skills for lifelong wellness

Students will demonstrate an ability to apply analytical methods using geospatial technology.

  • Extracting meaning from basic geometric operations of existing data sets or to derive new for further analysis.
  • Perform analytical operations using geospatial technology – specifically GIS – to answer a broad range of spatial problems.

1, 3, 4

Students will demonstrate basic knowledge in geographic phenomena, geographic information, and geographic tasks in relation to space, time, properties, and human concepts.  

1, 3, 4, 5

Students will demonstrate cartographic and visualization skills using geospatial technology.

  • Compile and manage geospatial data for cartography and visualization. Symbolization and labeling requirements will shape the way data used in the displays are selected, generalized, classified, projected, and manipulated.
  • Apply basic principles of map design, visualization, and cartographic design to display geographic data.

1, 2, 4

Students will demonstrate an understanding of geospatial database designs based on established methods and principles of database modeling used in computer science.

1, 3, 4

Students will apply data modeling methods using geospatial technology.

  • Analyze the mechanics built into data structures to facilitate search and retrieval of geospatial data.
  • Demonstrate knowledge in using database management systems (DBMS) in geographic contexts to better handle geographic data.
  • Apply Tessellation partitions of continuous surface data.
  • Analyze vector data models to represent discrete entities using points, lines, boundaries, and nodes as sets of coordinate values with associated attributes.

1, 3, 4

  • Students will demonstrate an ability to apply geo-computation techniques using geospatial technology in terms of spatial uncertainty in relation to input data and the nature of the estimation technique for model output.

1, 3, 4

Students will demonstrate an ability to apply geospatial data analysis.

  • Apply various models to measure the shape of Earth’s surface and how that impacts accuracy and measurement.
  • Apply various ways of geospatially referencing the earth in relation to spheres and ellipsoids.
  • Assess the geometric relationship between datums and coordinate systems of Earth’s surface.
  • Transform geographic coordinate systems into plane projections and explain the various distortions that can occur.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the importance of geospatial data quality in terms of uncertainty within the data, primary versus secondary sources, and appropriate fitness of use of data for a particular project.
  • Demonstrate basic understanding of how geospatial data conforms to legal accuracy standards for land surveying and global positioning systems (GPS).
  • Demonstrate an understanding of geospatial data standards of metadata for maximize efficiency, accuracy, and investment, and to reduce errors, uncertainty, and redundancy.

1, 3, 4

Students will demonstrate an ability to determine the role geospatial technology plays in society.

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the legal aspects of geospatial data and the potential misuse.
  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the economic aspects of institutions investing in geospatial technology.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how geospatial technology is used in local, state, and national governmental agencies, social services, public safety, economic and urban development, environmental management, and national defense.
  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of how organizations assert proprietary interests in relation to geospatial information and how it varies between public and private sectors and between nations.
  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the legal and ethical dissemination and access of geospatial information.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the ethical and moral choices and implications of decision making for individuals and organizations using geospatial information.

1, 2, 4, 5

Students will use demonstrate basic knowledge of the organizational and institutional aspects of geospatial technology.

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the institutional and inter-institutional aspects of geospatial technology.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of local, state, national, and international organizations that exist to coordinate, inform, and support geospatial activities.

 

1, 4, 5

Department Contact Info

Division of Natural Science

Taylorsville Redwood Campus
Science & Industry Building (SI) 345

General Information
801-957-4073

Program Information
801-957-4150

Geographic Information Science Technology Program

Academic Advisor
Taylorsville Redwood Campus
Science & Industry Building (SI) 209
801-957-4858

Program Faculty

Instructors
Robert Dastrup
Lauren Parker