SLCC General Catalog

Geography AS

CTE Associate of Science (AS)
63 credits minimum

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Program Description

This program provides a broad base of technical skills for information gathering and analysis as well as strong emphasis in physical geography and geology and an understanding of regional and global cultural aspects of the world. It provides a global awareness, creates a background for job opportunities and applications.  This program meets the needs of vocationally-oriented students with a two-year degree goal and also provides a solid foundation for a four-year degree program.

Transfer/Articulation

Admission into a major program at a transfer institution depends upon the receiving institution’s requirements for that major.

Some major programs are restricted and require special application as well as a competitive GPA.

See an Academic Advisor at both SLCC and the intended receiving institution for specific articulation information.

Estimated Time to Completion

If students follow the suggested semester schedule, time to completion is four semesters.

General Education Requirements

Core Skills:

Composition (EN) 6 Credits

ENGL 1010

Intro to Writing

3

A

WRTG 0990 w/C grade or better or appropriate Accuplacer score

ENGL 2010

Intermediate Writing

3

A

ENGL 1010 w/C grade or better

OR

 

 

 

ENGL 2100

Technical Writing

3

A

ENGL 1010 w/C grade or better

Quantitative Literacy (QL) 3 Credits

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

MATH 1030

Quantitative Analysis

3

A

RDG 0990; within the last year MATH 1010 w/C grade or better or appropriate Accuplacer score

American Institutions (AI) Choose 3 Credits From One Of The Following

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

ECON 1740

Econ History of US

3

A

RDG 0990 w/C grade or better or appropriate Accuplacer score

HIST 1700

American Civilization

3

A

RDG 0990 w/C grade or better or appropriate Accuplacer score

POLS 1100

US Govt & Politics

3

A

RDG 0990 w/C grade or better or appropriate Accuplacer score

Institutional Requirements:

Lifelong Wellness (LW) 1 Credit

Student Choice (IN or Depth) 3 Credits

Distribution Areas:

Choose one course (three credit hours) from each of the following distribution areas.  One of the courses must also be a Diversity course (DV).

Course

Credits

 

 

Biological Science (BS)

3-4

 

Fine Arts (FA)

3-4

 

Humanities (HU)

3

 

Interdisciplinary (ID)

3

 

Social Science (SS)

3

 

Physical Science (PS)

3

 

Required Courses: (31 Credits)

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

GEOG 1000

Earth’s Surface

3

A

 

GEOG 1400

Human Geography

3

F, Sp

 

GEOG 1300

Regional Geography

3

F, Sp

 

GEOG 1800

Geospatial Tech

3

A

 

GEOG 1820

Applied GIS I

3

F, Sp

GEOG 1800 or instructor approval

GEOG 1900

Special Studies

1-3

A

Instructor approval

GEOG 2100

Maps & Measure

3

F

 

GEOG 2200

Urban/Envirn Issues

3

Sp

 

GEO 1110

Physical Geology

3

F

Coreq: GEO 1115

GEO 1115

Physical Geo Lab

1

F

Coreq: GEO 1110

MET 1010

Intro to Meteorology

3

A

 

 

Sample Schedule

1st Year Schedule

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

ENGL 1010

3

ENGL 2010

3

GEOG 1000

3

GEOG 1400

3

GEOG 1300

3

GEOG 2200

3

GEOG 1800

3

MET 1010

3

Distribution

3

Distribution

3

Total

15

Total

15

2nd Year Schedule

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

GEOG 1900

1-3

GEOG 1820

3

GEOG 2100

3

MATH 1030

3

GEO 1110/1115

4

Student Choice

3

Distribution (2)

6

AI

3

LW

2

Distribution (2)

6

Total

15-17

Total

18

Advising Notes

It is the student’s responsibility to examine each course description for details of prerequisite courses. Those prerequisites must be satisfied before the designated course may be taken.  Students who need to take preparatory classes to meet the requirements of first semester courses should plan on extra time to complete the full program.  The semesters in which courses are taught are listed below. Students should check the semester class schedule for day/evening availability and modifications caused by varying enrollment.

Departmental Offerings

Course

Credits

Semesters

Prerequisite

GEOG 1000

Earth’s Surface

3

A

 

GEOG 1400

Human Geog

3

F, Sp

 

GEOG 1300

Regional Geog

3

F, Sp

 

GEOG 1700

Natural Disasters

3

A

 

GEOG 1780

Remote Sensing of Earth

3

F, Sp

 

GEOG 1800

Geospatial Technology

3

A

 

GEOG 1820

Applied GIS I

3

F, Sp

GEOG 1800 or instructor approval

GEOG 1900

Special Studies

1-3

A

Instructor approval

GEOG 2000

CO-OP

2-4

A

Instructor approval

GEOG 2100

Maps & Measur

3

F

 

GEOG 2200

Urban/Envirn Issues

3

Sp

 

GEOG 2900

Independ Projects

1-3

A

Instructor approval

GEOG 2920

Applied GIS II

3

Sp

GEOG 1820 or instructor approval

GEO 1010

Intro to Geology

3

A

 

GEO 1110

Physical Geol

3

F

Coreq: GEO 1115

GEO 1115

Physical Geo Lab

1

F

Coreq: GEO 1110

GEO 1060

Env Geology

3

Sp

Coreq: GEO 1065

GEO 1065

Env Geology Lb

1

Sp

Coreq: GEO 1060

GEO 1220

Historical Geol

3

Sp

GEO 1110. Coreq: GEO 1225

GEO 1225

History Geol Lab

1

Sp

Coreq: GEO 1220

GEO 2350

Field Studies

3

Su

Instructor approval

 

Program Student Learning Outcomes

Related College-Wide Student Learning Outcomes

Students will demonstrate the ability to

  • analyze natural processes and systems that dynamically influence the distribution of energy patterns around the planet (e.g. solar energy, atmospheric energy and temperatures, oceanic circulations.
  • assess natural processes and systems that dynamically influence the patterns of weather and climate around the planet (e.g. hydrologic cycle, water resources, elements of weather, storm processes, climate systems, along with natural and anthropogenic climate change).
  • analyze natural processes and systems that dynamically influence Earth’s landscape (e.g. plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanoes, weathering processes, and mass movement).
  • analyze natural processes and systems that dynamically influence the distribution of karst, desert, river, ocean, coastal, and glacial landforms).
  • assess the natural distribution and processes of ecosystems and biomes).
  • determine the role humans’ play in creating natural disasters according to categories such as population growth, poverty, environmental degradation, climate change, and politics along with ways to mitigate them.
  • produce bodies of work demonstrating analytical skills in spatial thinking using geospatial technology as a way to analyze and assess Earth’s natural processes.

1 – Substantive Knowledge

Students will demonstrate the ability to

  • assess various regions of the world in terms of their environment, culture, people, politics, economics, development, and diversity in order to determine what gives regions their uniqueness and commonality with other regions.
  • analyze geographic patterns and distributions of various cultural features across the earth (e.g. political divisions, religion, economics, industry, religion, language, agriculture, urbanization, population demographic, and natural resources).
  • analyze the spatial distribution, patterns, interrelationships, and conflicts with various regions of the world.
  • produce bodies of work demonstrating analytical skills in spatial thinking using geospatial technology as a way to analyze and assess the cultural environment.

2 – Communicate Effectively

Students will demonstrate the ability to

  • assess the impact of limited resources and the potential conflicts at a local, regional, state, and international level.
  • analyze the impacts of urban planning and development on the physical and social landscape at all levels of scale and scope (e.g. local, state, national, international levels).
  • analyze land-cover change patterns using geospatial technology to assess the human footprint on the planet.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the role human’s play in impacting Earth’s environment (e.g. environmental pollution, climate change, habitat loss, urban sprawl, deforestation and desertification, global population growth).
  • analyze the local, state, national, and international laws, treaties, and declarations that have been put in place to protect the environment, property of the commons, human rights, and trade.
  • produce bodies of work demonstrating analytical skills in spatial thinking using geospatial technology as a way to analyze and assess the human-environment connection.

3 – Develop Quantitative Literacy

Students will demonstrate the ability to

  • apply analytical thought processes using geographic inquiry and spatial thinking skills (e.g. patterns, distributions, interactions, movement, distance decay, and circulation).
  • extract meaning from geographic phenomena, geographic information, and geographic tasks in relation to space and time.
  • perform skills using geospatial technology (i.e. maps, aerial photography, satellite imagery, ArcGIS, Google Earth, ArcGIS Explorer, graphs, or spatial statistics) to compare the physical and cultural landscape.
  • analyze the legal aspects of geospatial data and the potential misuse.
  • determine the economic aspects of institutions investing in geospatial technology.
  • express how geospatial technology is used in local, state, and national governmental agencies, social services, public safety, business, criminal justice  economic and urban development, environmental management, and national defense.
  • determine the legal and ethical dissemination and access of geospatial information.
  • assess the ethical and moral choices and implications of decision making for individuals and organizations using geospatial information.

4 – Think Critically

Department Contact Info

Division of Natural Sciences

Taylorsville Redwood Campus
Science & Industry Building (SI) 345

General Information
801-957-4073

Program Information
801-957-4150

Geography Program

Academic Advisor
Taylorsville Redwood Campus
Science & Industry Building (SI) 209
801-957-4858

Program Faculty

Associate Professors
Frank Komatar

Instructor
Robert Dastrup
Lauren Parker