Office Professional

Office and administrative support professionals provide administrative support to corporations all over the world and are key employees to many organizations. Their workplace titles vary and may include administrative assistant, secretary, executive assistant, bookkeeper, office manager, office clerk, or receptionist.

Daily responsibilities for office professionals include data base, filing system, and project management; office supply and equipment oversight; vendor relations; answering telephone; research; business correspondence, spreadsheets, and reports; and meeting, event, and travel coordination. The ability to multi-task, adapt to different management styles, and use different computer software is essential in this career field.

A high school diploma or equivalent is typically the minimum requirement for office professionals. Generally, short-term on-the-job training is provided by the employer.

For entry level positions, like office or data entry clerk and receptionist, the following technology workshops are recommended. Workshops are taught in a classroom setting. A certificate of achievement is awarded for each course successfully completed.

Perform routine clerical and administrative functions such as drafting correspondence, scheduling appointments, organizing and maintaining paper and electronic files, or providing information to others.

  • Use computers for various applications, such as database management or word processing.
     
  • Answer telephones and give information to callers, take messages, or transfer calls to appropriate individuals.
     
  • Create, maintain, and enter information into databases.
     
  • Set up and manage paper or electronic filing systems, recording information, updating paperwork, or maintaining documents, such as attendance records, correspondence, or other material.
     
  • Operate office equipment, such as fax machines, copiers, or phone systems and arrange for repairs when equipment malfunctions.
     

Skills

  • Clerical — Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology. 
     
  • English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar. 
     
  • Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction. 
     
  • Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming. 
     
  • Administration and Management — Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

Tasks

  • Use computers for various applications, such as database management or word processing.
     
  • Answer telephones and give information to callers, take messages, or transfer calls to appropriate individuals.
     
  • Create, maintain, and enter information into databases.
     
  • Set up and manage paper or electronic filing systems, recording information, updating paperwork, or maintaining documents, such as attendance records, correspondence, or other material.
     
  • Operate office equipment, such as fax machines, copiers, or phone systems and arrange for repairs when equipment malfunctions.
  • Getting Information: Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
     
  • Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates: Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
     
  • Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge: Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
     
  • Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships: Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
     
  • Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others: Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
     
  • Interacting With Computers: Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
     
  • Processing Information: Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
     
  • Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events: Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
     
  • Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work: Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.

Tuition:

Tuition for a computer workshops range from $99 to $499

 

Tuition Assistance:

Short-Term Intensive Training tuition (STIT) assistance may be available. Please call 801-957-4845 for additional information.