SLCC's Learning Outcomes

Documenting Your Progress Toward Essential Learning Outcomes

The Goals and Outcomes page of your ePortfolio should list SLCC's Learning Outcomes. You can copy and paste them right from this page into your ePortfolio. These are essential capacities that all students should possess regardless of academic major or career plans, for they will serve you well in all aspects of your life. When you put assignments and reflection in the course pages of your ePortfolio, revisit your Goals and Outcomes page and create links from the Learning Outcomes to the work in your courses. Here are some examples of how this is done in Weebly, Wordpress, and Google Sites. Remember that as you take a variety of General Education courses, your professors are engaged in a collective effort to help you achieve these learning outcomes.


SLCC's Learning Outcomes

  • Students communicate effectively. This includes developing critical literacies—reading, writing, speaking, listening, visual understanding—that they can apply in various contexts; organizing and presenting ideas and information orally, visually, and in writing according to standard usage; understanding and using the elements of effective communication in interpersonal, small group, and mass settings.
  • Students develop quantitative literacies necessary for their chosen field of study. This includes interpreting, calculating, and communicating with quantitative evidence; collecting, interpreting, analyzing, and visualizing data.
  • Students think critically. This includes reasoning effectively from available evidence; taking imaginative and complex positions in their work; engaging in reflective thinking and expression; demonstrating higher-order skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation; problem solving; and applying interdisciplinary and scientific methods to the inquiry process.
  • Students express themselves creatively. This includes engaging in the creative process to produce unique artwork, designs, or performances; analyzing, interpreting, and critiquing creative works; and producing a unique and professional General Education ePortfolio.
  • Students develop civic literacy and the capacity to be community-engaged learners who act in mutually beneficial ways with community partners. This includes producing learning artifacts indicating understanding of the political, historical, economic or sociological aspects of social change and continuity; thinking critically about—and weighing the evidence surrounding—issues important to local, national, or global communities; participating in a broad range of community-engagement and/or service-learning courses for community building and an enhanced academic experience.
  • Students develop the knowledge and skills to work with others in a professional and constructive manner. This includes engaging with a diverse set of others to produce professional work, contributing to team meetings and performances, making individual contributions outside of team meetings and performances, fostering a constructive team climate, and creating fair and equitable roles based on team members’ diverse backgrounds and skills.
  • Students develop information literacy. This includes the demonstrated ability to find, synthesize, assess, create, engage with, and cite information in a professional and ethical manner; to conceive that the research process is reflective and iterative; and to understand how information is produced and valued. These abilities and dispositions are rooted in the Framework for Information Literacy developed and adopted by the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL).
  • Students develop computer and information literacy. This includes using contemporary computer hardware and software to effectively complete college-level assignments; Gathering and analyzing information using technology, library resources, and other modalities; Understanding and acting upon ethical and security principles with respect to computer technology and to information acquisition and distribution; Distinguishing between credible and non-credible sources of information, and using the former in their work in an appropriately documented fashion.